Category Archives: education

#EP4LA #LAK15 ethics workshop – student vulnerability, agency and learning analytics: an exploration (Prinsloo and Slade)


We presented a paper around student vulnerability as an interpretative lens for consideration of student control and choices around uses of their data within higher education. Background given on general lack of clarity and policy with HEIs. Range of consent … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Virtual collaboration in the built environment


Mark Childs, Loughborough University Students collaboratively work on a project brief, design a building for a specific site, submit a report and reflect on process. Learners constrict meaning through the act of design. Meaning is constructed jointly by the community. … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Digital storytelling as a effective practice tool in a community of professionals


Corrado Petrucco, Univ of Padova The human brain seems to manage to understand stories rather than logical processes, but stories but still follow some rules. A good story can be used as the basis of an argument to convince others. … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Interesting work and open education


Alan Tait, keynote speaker day two Challenges of work in life: context of increasing unemployment across Europe, country average of about 11%, range is between 5 and 27%, particularly bad for 18- 25 year olds. Threat from unemployment: this is … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Filling the gap: e-skills for jobs


Andre Richier, keynote speaker day two context of growing unemployment and problems within industry of not being able to find people with the right skills. New demographic reality, a youth bulge in the developing world, Africa and asia’s labour force … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 educational triage in higher online education: walking a moral tightrope


Paul Prinsloo, Unisa and Sharon Slade, Open University consider the issues associated with distance learning, retention and time taken to complete. Students as the walking wounded and HE as the battlefield. Are students walking around with invisible triage tags attached … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Student and staff perceptions of the use of multiple choice testing in higher education assessments


Kay Penny, Edinburgh Napier University Study into multiple choice questions as part of assessment strategy in HE, set against context of widening access, adult learners, prior learning experiences, international students, etc. MCQs give a quick and easy response, but how … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Designing authentic learning activities and environments: theory and practice


Andrea Gregg, Rick Shearer, Heather Dawson, Penn State University (World campus, approx 14000 online students) Mostly adult learners, average age 30s, often in employment. Presenting four case studies.  Domain related practices, applicable to the students’ own context, ownership of the … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 Digital education and lifelong learning


Jeff Haywood, Univ of Edinburgh. 2nd Keynote speaker on day one of EDEN2014. Traditional settings can offer powerful teaching and learning. How can this be replicated online? Haywood states that MOOCs are the froth on the top of a cappuccino … Continue reading

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#EDEN14 E-learning and employability shift focus on learning(again)


Blazenka Divjak, Univ of Zagreb Keynote speaker on day one of EDEN2014. Posed three questions: Is talking about learning truly mainstream? Do we know at least some of the answers? What can we learn from business and industry? Dilemmas: are … Continue reading

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